magyar moon

magyar moon

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

ERTE

Romain de Tirtoff (1892-1990)

Russian-born French artist and designer.
Known by the pseudonym Erte, which is the French pronunciation of his initials.

Erte



 The Nile

Slave of Salome



Wings of Victory
1919
Harpers Bazaar

 Spring Rain




The Bride


L'Ocean 1925
costume design for Les Mers



 The Mirror


The Letter "L"

 Symphony in Black



Winter







 Peacock

Bubbles

Her Secret Admirers

 Erte in his 90's

20 comments:

  1. Beautiful post. You lit up what had been just another dreary afternoon at work. I've also been similarly moved by his glass work. I've never been attracted to glass at antique shops and shows. I'll have to start looking them over. I'll probably faint with sticker shock. Thank you!!!

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    1. Delighted to know that this lit up your day. I honestly don't know a lot about Erte, but I've always loved his work. I think he deserves some future posts.

      I'm sure the sticker shock will be electrifying.

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  2. I love how intricate his drawings are. The longer you look, the more detail you see. I do believe that "Her Secret Admirers" are wearing their hearts on their sleeves. The birdcage as a skirt may be a tribute to Marie Antoinette. I think I read she had a birdcage woven into one of her elaborate hair designs.
    I'd like to know what the arms and heads emerging from the skirt in the picture above "The Mirror" are supposed to represent.

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    1. You're right about "Her Secret Admirers" - they are wearing hearts on their sleeves.

      I did a little research on the picture above "The Mirror".
      It is called "L'Ocean" and was a costume design for "Les Mers".
      "Les Mers" was one of several Broadway revues by producer George White. They were similar to the Ziegfeld Follies.
      But I have no idea what the emerging heads and arms represent.

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  3. A remarkably talented --and long-lived-- man. Excellent post!

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    1. I'm fascinated by Erte's work, which was strongly influenced by Aubrey Beardsley. I plan to do future posts on both artists.

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  4. art deco! mistress maddie will love the peacock (no doubt about it)! the letter L reminds me of kim kartrashian for some reason. I like the dancer (third one from the top).

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    1. Believe it or not, I thought of Mistress Maddie when I saw the peacock one.
      The dancer that you like reminds me of Isadora Duncan.

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  5. Gorgeous work. I love seeing these anytime!

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    1. Erte did so many amazing things that it's impossible to choose favorites. I'll definitely feature him again.

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  6. Replies
    1. The more I look at the designs, the more intricate they become. It's amazing.

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  7. He'd such soulful eyes!
    I know next to nothing about design, but many of these strike me as having a far-East influence.

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    1. I don't know much about design, either, but a far-East influence was indeed very popular in the teens and 1920's.

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  8. So beautiful. It makes you just want to stare at them for hours.

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    1. I was initially hesitant to post this because I didn't think it would generate much interest. I'm delighted that you and others find it as beautiful and fascinating as I do.

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  9. I knew the name Erte, because I do a lot of crossword puzzles, but this is the first time I've ever seen any of his work. It's fabulous! Every single one of them, but I especially like the ones whose lines seem to depict movement.

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  10. I don't know much about Erte but I've always liked his style. I'm glad you were able to finally get a glimpse of his stuff!

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  11. Have you seen the art he designed for the Courvoisier cognac collection? Limited edition from France

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  12. No I haven't, but I'll definitely do a Google search. There's so much that I still don't know about him.

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