magyar moon

magyar moon

Thursday, March 9, 2017

IN MY MERRY MOTOR CAR

It's painfully obvious that I'm desperate for post titles....

This is a hodgepodge collection of old automobile photos. My information concerning them is limited (I have no clue about the makes or models of the cars) but they're fascinating to look at.

 "Fill 'er up!"

Mrs. F. Blevin and daughter - 1907

George Earl Chamberlain in 1919
(former governor of Oregon)
Just like new
 Taxi cabs at Union Station
Washington D.C. 1914
George P. Wetmore and wife
in 1909
Senator and former governor of Rhode Island 
 Sunday drive - circa 1905

 Ralph Coffin jumping over Sylvanus Stoke's Rolls Royce in 1916.
That horse looks pretty darn close to the car. I imagine that's Mr. Stokes on the left - - screaming.
 It's that pesky horse jumper again
sailing over the same Rolls Royce. It was hard to tell in the first photo, but the car is occupied.
 Red Cross Motor Corps, 1918

Ft. Myers, around 1916

Armored car, 1917
Captain Renwick
J. Pierpont Morgan, 1914
 Herbert Hoover, 1917
 Hudson Autos, Washington D.C.
(year unknown) 
Underwood Typewriter Company truck
 Mrs. John E. Harris
The dame has a great set of wheels
 Mechanics working in garage
date unknown

Heck, they all break down now and then....


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5 comments:

  1. Love to look at old cars, would like to have one to just drive around in on Sundays. My youngest granddaughter won many medals and ribbons for jumping hurdles on a horse when they lived in England. Don't think she ever jumped a car. The ladies driving the old cars are so elegant. My Daddy didn't think women should drive so I didn't learn until I married in 1956. Thank goodness my husband didn't share his opinion. In fact didn't agree with him at all.

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  2. I also didn't drive until I got married. Lovely look at all these vintage vehicles. They were fascinating, indeed.

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  3. Jon, the coachwork that went into these machines has always entranced me. There was an aspect to these cars that reflected pride in craft and dignity in ownership. Best safety feature was in slow speed. I appreciate this beautiful post.

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  4. Really cool old cars!! Loved these. :)

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  5. Ha! Great finale!
    I'm struck how these men and women both managed to look so cool and elegant in what today might be called, their 'formal' wear. Did people not perspire back then?

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