magyar moon

magyar moon

Thursday, August 10, 2017

GLOEDEN UNDER WRAP



 Gloeden

Wilhelm von Gloeden (1856-1931) was a German photographer who is remembered almost exclusively for his "pastoral" photos of nude men and boys.

He went to Italy around 1878 for health reasons (possibly tuberculosis) and remained there the rest of his life (except for a few years during World War I).
Gloeden's villa and studio in Taormina, Sicily, was a mecca for local Italian youths whom he
used as models for his photography.

After Gloeden's death, his studio was raided by Mussolini's Fascist Police who seized and destroyed thousands of photo prints and glass negatives (for being deemed "obscene"). Consequently, only a fraction of Gloeden's vast photographic output remains today.

I've decided to keep most of Gloeden's models "under wrap"  in the following collection: mostly portraits - and no full frontal nudity.
Note:
I'm not a prude - - I'm just too lazy to change my blog settings to "adult content".

One of Gloeden's models, with Mt. Vesuvius smoking in the background.

Portrait of a boy, 1899







Gloeden occasionally used local girls and young women as models.


.. ...and now and then, a boy dressed as a girl.....

 














Photo taken in Gloeden's villa at Taormina

 Model in a religious pose

The same model as "Nero"
(and he does resemble Nero)








Those eyes!


9 comments:

  1. It seems to me that some of these poses are similar to Greek or Roman statues. Too bad so much of his work was destroyed. Everyone is so somber; an attempt to make his art not appear salacious to others? Did he sell his photos or were they only his personal collection? Here I go, Googling again (I can't believe spellcheck doesn't object to Googling) Also, I hoped if I kept checking this site that sooner or later you'd post something.
    t

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  2. Gloeden was strongly influenced by ancient Greek and Roman art and culture. His photographs were exhibited widely (during his lifetime) in major cities around the world - and I suppose he also sold his works. He received some financial support from wealthy patrons.

    I'm delighted to know that you still have an interest in this blog. I was initially thinking of abandoning it. Lately, blogging has been more of a burden to me than a pleasure. I seem to have lost interest.

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    1. A little research indicated that most of his work that sold to the public was landscapes. His lover inherited everything when he died and that is who Mussolini raided. His title of baron was disputed by the branch of the family he would have inherited it from. There is a museum in Florence with a lot of his surviving works. All in all a very interesting individual.

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  3. Yes, reminds me of the Greeks and Romans, too. He would have thrived back then.
    Seems to love to have them pose looking so innocent and calm...whether clothed or naked. :)

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    1. Many of Gloeden's nude photos were subtlety suggestive - it's interesting and rather ironic that he frequently incorporated religious subjects in his "clothed" photos.

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  4. i also noted the similarity between the photographs and statuary of the greeks and romans. one can hardly imagine all the pictures destroyed by Mussolini.

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    1. I suppose incorporating mythology and history into the nude photos made them seem more "legitimate" and artistic to the unsuspecting public. And it actually makes them more interesting to look at.

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  5. Thank you for alerting me to these wonderful photos, Jon. My collection is mostly of stereoviews from when I wrote historical articles. Never ran across any 3-d work from von Gloeden and appreciate these examples. I sure learn here.

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    1. I knew you'd show up here, Geo, and I appreciate it! I remember that my fifth grade teacher had a stereoscope which she shared with the class and I absolutely loved it. I always wanted one.

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